Category Archives: Devotional

Episode 204 | The Spirit Says

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-i2h5k-104caf7

In this episode, Rev. Todd discusses the importance of the Holy Spirit as one of three coequal persons in the Holy Trinity. Let us discover how this can bring us toward spiritual maturity as well as toward hope, healing, and wholeness.

EPISODE NOTES:

First UMC of Newton, NJ premieres worship online on Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Join us for worship on YouTube.

If you worship with us online and/or you would like to give to First UMC of Newton, your generosity will help us sustain with our mission and ministries during this COVID-19 pandemic. We are still paying our staff and we are still ministering to people in our community and beyond. Your support is vital to us being able to do so. Thank you for considering giving at https://tithe.ly/give?c=1377216 or https://paypal.me/newtonumc.

Sign up for bi-weekly devotions at Life-Giving Water.

Subscribe to Life-Giving Water Messages, also on iTunes and Google Play Music.

Subscribe to the Party on Johncast, co-hosted by Rev. Sal Seirmarco and Rev. Todd Lattig

A LOOK BACK: Children of God

Read John 1:6-13

ALSO IN SCRIPTURE

“See how very much our Father loves us, for he calls us his children, and that is what we are! But the people who belong to this world don’t recognize that we are God’s children because they don’t know him.” (1 John 3:1 NLT)

There are so many things that tear us human beings a part. There are, unfortunately, far more things that divide and separate us than there are that unite us. I wish that wasn’t the case; however, when we look at the world, at our country, at our regions, at our towns, our churches, our families, and other aspects of human existance, we do not see a decreasing amount of division, but rather more and more of it. 
Rececntly, I was watching the movie “Underworld: Rise of the Lycans”. This film is the third out of five films in the Underworld franchise, and it is a prequel to all of them. It takes place back in the Medieval time period, where Vampires are Lords who rule over the land by night. While they remain hidden from human society, the operate within it. Hence the name “Underground”, there’s human society and then the secret society of vampires who pray upon humanity.

But this film isn’t just about vampires, it is also about Lycans. The name Lycan comes from the word lycanthropy, which is a mental illness in which humans think they are becoming wolves and even begin to take on the characteristics of wolves. Of course, these Lycans are not people with mental illness, but are actually werewolves. Unfortunately for them, the Vampires look at these Lycans as being “mindless beasts” who are beneath them in every way. So, the Vampires enslaved them and forbid any vampire from having romantic and/or sexual relationships with them. To do such was considered an abomination.

This prejudice was produced out of a fear, but it was certainly not grounded on reality. When one watches the Underworld series, one quickly finds out that both vampires and werewolves are from the same bloodline. The vampires descend from Marcus Corvinus and the werewolves descend from William Corvinus. Marcus and William were brothers; they were both the sons of Alexander Corvinus. One was bitten by bat, the other by wolf, but both had the same parents. Lucian, who rises up to be the leader of the werewolf army, said it best to his vampire lover Sonja, “We are both children of Corvinus. Yet my kind are slaves.”

Even if you have never seen the films, I don’t think the metaphor will be lost on you. Clearly, we can look throughout human history and see how human beings have hated each other, enslaved each other, murdered each other, and dehumanized each other as a result of fear. Fear has motivated humanity to do many wicked and evil things. Well fear and greed, both of which are not mutually exclusive. We are all children of God, and yet we look at other human beings who are different than us as if they don’t share that same heritage with us.

The hope of Christianity is comes from Jesus Christ who gave each of us the right, and the responsibility, to reclaim our heritage in God. Each of us have been given the right to be called children of God; however, that right bears some real responsibility with it. Being a child of God does not mean we’re in some sort of elite, underground, secret society. It does not mean that we are more special, loved, or valued than anyone else. It certainly does not mean we are better or above anyone else. It means that we recognize that we were created in God’s image and, through Jesus Christ, are allowing that image to be reflected in our lives. What this means, specifically, is that we will no longer be agents of division and discord, but agents of unity, acceptance, affirmation and unconditional love. We are children of God. Let us point others to the revelation of that reality as well.

THOUGHT OF THE DAY

“Fear lead to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering.” – Master Yoda

PRAYER

Lord, help us to lay aside our fear to see all people, no matter how different, as your children. Amen.

A LOOK BACK: Just Who Do You Think I Am?

Read Romans 7:7-25

ALSO IN SCRIPTURE
“For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life through Christ Jesus our Lord.” (Romans 6:23 NLT)

CrossRedeemed

If you were to ask any of the students I have had over the years for confirmation class, they would tell you that one of the major projects I have them do is write a theological essay on who people say Jesus Christ is, and to also write about who they believe Jesus Christ to be. This essay is based off of the two questions Jesus asked his disciples, “Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, ‘Who do people say that the Son of Man is? Who do you say that I am’” (Matthew 16:13, 15b)?

There were no wrong answers, and it wasn’t anything they were graded on. The purpose of the required exercise was two-fold: 1) To help them develop the skill of critical theological thinking and the ability to articulate the Christian faith as they have been taught it. 2) To promote critical thinking around their own experiences with Jesus Christ, as well as to give them the opportunity to express those experiences and their own understanding of who Christ is in writing to themselves. Later in life, they can look back on those answers and see how their understanding has grown over the years.

Recently, while driving, I was listening to the Christian metal band Demon Hunter’s album, “Extremist.” The first song on that album is “Death”. This song, to me, is the opposite exercise. Unlike the exercise I have my confirmation students (aka confirmands) go through, this song is not asking the listener who they think Christ is, but rather it is asking that same question in regard to all of the other influences in their lives.

Actually, the song is a reflection, in part, on the tendency to idolize people like him, as if they are some sort of paragon of perfection. With that said, I also think that this song works beyond just Ryan Clark, but other people and/or influences in our lives that we turn to in order to be “saved” from ourselves and our circumstances. In the song, Ryan Clark screams, “I’m not your gateway. I’m not your prodigal son. I’m the vile lesser-than. Just who do you think I am? I’m not your standard. I’m not your vision divine. I am not sacrificial lamb. Just who do you think I am? I am death.”

Ryan is not stating that he is literally Death, as in the Grim Reaper. Nor is he stating that he is evil or that he has no part to play in helping others. That is not what he is saying at all; rather, he is stating that ONLY CHRIST is the savior. We all, including Ryan, are sinners and we are all in need of being saved. How do I know that’s what Ryan actually meant when writing the song? Here’s what Ryan has to say about it:

‘By our very nature, we are a sinful people. It doesn’t matter which side of the fence you stand on, that will always be the case. If you don’t see it, you’re not paying attention. There is no pretending to be impervious to it. The answer is revealed in the realization of its existence, and the understanding that you are in need of forgiveness. The wages of sin is death. Eternal death. My desire is to be an instrument for this revelation, but my words alone can only point the way. I am no savior.’

Amen. We are all in need of being saved and, for those who recognize that need, salvation rests in Jesus Christ who literally HELD NO BARS in ensuring that  salvation for us, should we desire and ask for it. Our way, apart from the eternal love that is GOD in Jesus Christ, leads to death. This need not merely be in some other-worldly sense either. Just look at the wisdom and “saving plans” of human beings running amok in the world. Look at the broken relationships, the drug addiction, the abject poverty, the abuse and oppression, the genocide and the governing for SELF-INTEREST. It is clear, we humans are not saviors, but lesser-than (to use the lyrics).

We are, apart from Christ, death. Yet, as Ryan rightly points out, those of us who are saved are called to point the way to Christ, who is the revelation of God’s unconditional, saving love. We may not be the savior, but we intimately know the savior and can introduce people to our Lord and Savior. If you feel lost in your life, if you feel surrounded by dead ends and hopelessness, there is a way out of such despair. There is a way to abundant and joyful life. That way is Jesus Christ and I pray that you two get in touch. Find a pastor or someone grounded in faith who can support you in that. If you are a person of faith, be willing to be the vessel that points the least, the last and the lost to the One who LOVES and SAVES THEM beyond all measures!

THOUGHT OF THE DAY
“He that falls into sin is a [human]; that grieves at it, is a saint; that boasteth of it, is a devil.” – Thomas Fuller

PRAYER
Lord, have mercy on me a sinner. May I always point to your saving grace. Amen.

Episode 203 | Firebrand

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-z7a9z-1042c81

In this episode, Rev. Todd discusses the importance of the Holy Spirit and how the Spirit perfects us in God’s love.

EPISODE NOTES:

First UMC of Newton, NJ premieres worship online on Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Join us for worship on YouTube.

If you worship with us online and/or you would like to give to First UMC of Newton, your generosity will help us sustain with our mission and ministries during this COVID-19 pandemic. We are still paying our staff and we are still ministering to people in our community and beyond. Your support is vital to us being able to do so. Thank you for considering giving at https://tithe.ly/give?c=1377216 or https://paypal.me/newtonumc.

Sign up for bi-weekly devotions at Life-Giving Water.

Subscribe to Life-Giving Water Messages, also on iTunes and Google Play Music.

Subscribe to the Party on Johncast, co-hosted by Rev. Sal Seirmarco and Rev. Todd Lattig

A LOOK BACK: Better Than Eden

Read Genesis 2:4-25

ALSO IN SCRIPTURE 
“And I have given every green plant as food for all the wild animals, the birds in the sky, and the small animals that scurry along the ground—everything that has life.” And that is what happened.” (Genesis 1:30 NLT)

  Most people, by now, know that I am vegan. I am not shy about that fact, as it is a lifestyle change that not only transformed me into who I am today, but one that saved my very life. The first year of my being vegan was the roughest time for me, mostly because I had so much to come to terms with. I had to come to terms that I was no longer “fat”, not only in my own perception, but in other people’s pereception as well. I had to come to terms with the fact that I was disease free, that I no longer ate what anyone else in my circle of family, friends, and colleagues ate.

I had to come to terms with the fact that every meal would become a discussion about my lifestyle and that such discussions would cause others around the table to be angry at me, even if I wasn’t the one initiating the conversation, because they were “sick of hearing about it”. I also had to come to terms with the fact that some people would view my lifestyle as a threat to their own and attack me over it, especially on social media as I shared about my lifestyle, or shared recipes and/or things I learned on my Facebook wall.

Halfway through my first year, I had an idea about “Returning to Eden”. I thought it would make for a great book title, and I thought that I would be able to write about about my own journey of returning to eden. I got the idea of the name from a conversation I was having with a long-time friend about how the only life that existed in Eden as the vegan life. Adam, Eve, the animals, birds, bugs, lizards, and creepy crawlers were all created to eat and be sustained on vegetables (Genesis 1:29-31). God saw that as the ideal way of living, and so did the ancients evidentally.

The conversation was centered on how far humanity has fallen from that ideal, and how we could once again return to Eden. After all, I was on the way, wasn’t I? I had reversed my type-2 diabetes, lost over 75 lbs (at the time), eliminated my high blood pressure, and lowered my cholesterol to normal levels. Things were great and I was well on the returning to Eden.

Well, over time, reality hit. What has been lost can never be returned to. There was no going back to Eden. I believe that is why it says in Genesis, “After sending them out, the LORD God stationed mighty cherubim to the east of the Garden of Eden. And He placed a flaming sword that flashed back and forth to guard the way to the tree of life.” (Genesis 3:24) It’s not that I take the account literally as if there were some Garden of Eden out there to be found, and if we found it we would see those Cherubim guarding it; rather, I believe the point of it is that Eden/Paradise/Creation as God intended it had been lost.

There was nothing that could be done to reclaim it. Certainly, eating from the Tree of Life would not have brought Eden back, or us back to Eden. Instead, it would have forever divided us from God in our sins. Eden could not be reclaimed, but God had something better than Eden planned. While sin and death were not God’s doing, God would conquer sin and death on the cross through Jesus the Christ. The empty tomb would be a sign forever opening up to the reality that human beings were God’s children, not by virtue of being Created by God, but by virtue of choosing to be in a loving relationship with God our Creator.

True LOVE is mutual LOVE. Love is not love by force nor can love exist without choice. LOVE is better than Eden and it is the Kingdom on Earth God has been building ever since humanity first chose their own independence over and above a mutual, loving, dependent relationship with our Creator. The days of Eden are over and the days of our bondage to sin are numbered. Behold, in Christ God has done something completely new and you are being invited to join in on that. God is inviting you to not only receive this true LOVE, but to extend it to the world and be a part of leading to a place far better than Eden.

THOUGHT OF THE DAY

We can never head back to what has been lost, but we can change direction and head toward something far better if we so choose.

PRAYER

Lord, I thank you and praise you for your great intervention in my sinfulness. Lead me to lead others to a place far greater than Eden, to that heavenly Kingdom you have created for us all. Amen.

A LOOK BACK: The Problem with Modern Love

Read 1 Corinthians 13

ALSO IN SCRIPTURE
“Dear friends, let us continue to love one another, for love comes from God. Anyone who loves is a child of God and knows God.” (1 John 4:7 NLT)

love

As a Christian pastor in the United Methodist Church, I have officiated in plenty of weddings and funerals. That just goes with the territory and, quite honestly, I am always honored when people seek me out to celebrate in their mutual love, or when people request that I be with them in their times of loss and grief. After all, did not the Lord Jesus Christ do such things?

As any pastor can tell you, one of the most requested (if not THE MOST requested) Scriptures for weddings is 1 Corinthians 13. Because that scripture talks about an enduring love, people automatically link it to the marital union between two loving partners. I think that this, unfortunately, does a disservice to what the Apostle Paul was actually writing about. I can assure you that, as a self-imposed, celibate man, Paul of Tarsus was not thinking about marriage when he penned those immortal words.

As such, whenever I am asked to utilize that particular passage at a wedding, I make a point of bringing the true meaning of the text into my message before tying it into the marital covenant. This is is important because there is huge problem with modern love. What I mean by this is that the modern understanding of love is shallow at best. It is all about peaches and cream, fuzzy bunnies and puppie dogs, kisses and hugs, compliments and unconditional affinity.

This modern understanding has been propagated by enless jewelry advertisements, happily ever-after romance novels/films, motivational speakers, prosperity preachers, societal pressures, and new age and/or civic theology that renders love into an emotional experience to be had within oneself. In a nutshell, love is rendered into a feel-good, warm and fuzzy experience centered around our over-inflated egos.

We tend to see love in those who make us feel good ourselves and in those who tell us how beautiful, great, smart, and awesome we are. Conversely, we tend to not see love in anyone who disagrees with us, calls us out for being wrong, encourages us to change course, or stands in our way from getting we want. After all, how could someone possibly love us and disagree with how great we are,    right?

Let me really clear about this: LOVE IS NOT ABOUT SELF-WORSHIP! It is not about us at all. LOVE IS ABOUT GOD. In fact, GOD IS LOVE. When Paul is writing about the characteristics of love, he is actually writing the characteristics of God as revealed in Jesus Christ. In other words, despite our often misconceptions of God, Jesus revealed to us that God was patient and kind, forgiving, slow to anger, and keeps no record of being wronged. God does not rejoice at injustice, but rejoices whenever truth wins out. God never gives up, never stops being faithful, is always hopeful, and endures through all things.

God loved us so much that, in order to redeem us in that love, God became a human being and lived among us. As that human being, God taught us what TRUE LOVE is all about. Love is sacrificial, it is in service of others, it holds people accountable to who they were created to be as opposed to who they are, and it is persistent in being present with others even when to do so comes at a great cost. Jesus Christ is the embodiment of God, who is love. As Christians, we ough to be the embodiment of Christ, who is Lord, and bear that LOVE out into the world.

THOUGHT OF THE DAY
Love is not just a verb, but a noun that calls us be verbs.

PRAYER
Lord, you loved me even when I have not loved you back. Help me to model that love in my life and act it out in the world. Amen.

Episode 202 | I See You, part 4: Diverse People, One Vision

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-7agrc-1038986

In this episode, Rev. Todd discusses the importance of Christian Unity and how diversity is vital to unity.

EPISODE NOTES:

First UMC of Newton, NJ premieres worship online on Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Join us for worship on YouTube.

If you worship with us online and/or you would like to give to First UMC of Newton, your generosity will help us sustain with our mission and ministries during this COVID-19 pandemic. We are still paying our staff and we are still ministering to people in our community and beyond. Your support is vital to us being able to do so. Thank you for considering giving at https://tithe.ly/give?c=1377216 or https://paypal.me/newtonumc.

Sign up for bi-weekly devotions at Life-Giving Water.

Subscribe to Life-Giving Water Messages, also on iTunes and Google Play Music.

Subscribe to the Party on Johncast, co-hosted by Rev. Sal Seirmarco and Rev. Todd Lattig

Pedestal

Read Exodus 20:1-6

ALSO IN SCRIPTURE
“Friends, why are you doing this? We are merely human beings—just like you! We have come to bring you the Good News that you should turn from these worthless things and turn to the living God, who made heaven and earth, the sea, and everything in them” (Acts 14:15, NLT).

Growing up, there were many things that I aspired to be. I wanted to be an astronaut, an author, a poet, an explorer, a rock star, a web site developer, and a computer programmer. There were so many things, as a child, that I dreamed I would grow up being. Certainly none of them included most of the labor intensive jobs I did end up holding as a young adult: at Burger King, Arbys, in a factory that made rubber hubs and things for technology, in a factory/warehouse that specialized in professional kitchenware, and as an Iron Worker.

From the youngest age and my earliest memories, I wanted to be a pastor. I would pull out my mom’s 8-track tower (yes, this dates me) and would use that as a pulpit to preach from. I would stand at that “pulpit” and preach that “God tells us to love one another”, in my 3-4 year old voice. I loved my Bible, even if I fully didn’t understand it and I just had a connection with Jesus that was unique, especially for someone my age at the time.

Of course, as a teenager, I fell away from my call and wanted to be all the aforementioned things I dreamed about. That, honestly, is not all that unusual. There are so many career paths for kids to follow that it can be overwhelming to just settle on one and, like most kids at the age of 15-17, I was not looking to serve in a church. In fact, from the age 17 and onward, I left Christianity and practiced another religion for several years.

Eventually, however, Christ brought me back to the call He had placed on my heart all those years ago as a young child. So, at 26 years old, I came back to the church and immediately began working toward my call. By age 27, I was enrolled in community college to finish out my associates degree. By 28, I was enrolled at Montclair State University in order to get a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Philosophy and, by 29, I was enrolled at Drew Theological Schoool to work toward a Master of Divinity degree.

That year was 2007 and, given that I had a family and children, and was working as a youth pastor at my home church, as well as a substitute teacher, I could not afford to finish in 3 years. I ended up graduating in 2011 with an M. Div. From 2011 onward, I worked toward ordination. I was appointed pastor of small church in 2012 and also served as the Director of Mission and Pastoral Care (aka chaplain) at a Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC). It took me from 2011 to 2017 to get through the process and be ordained. In 2017, I was appointed to my current appointment, where I serve my congregation full-time.

Over the years, as a pastor, I have noticed that I often get put up on a pedestal as if I am the epitome of faith and faithfulness. Because of my role, people in my congregation and in my surrounding community look up to me as if I am “holy”, “Godly”, and as if I have everything together in my life. My family, similarly, gets viewed in the same light. Because they live in my household, they must all be fluent in the Bible, the doctrines of the church, and they must have a joy to do all things “church” and nothing else.

Of course, these perceptions and expectations are not accurate, to say the least, and they are not healthy for the pastor, the family of the pastor, or for the congregation. As a pastor, I am constantly having to remind people that I am merely human and while, yes, I have been set apart to serve God, I am not superhuman and I do not always have everything together. In fact, if you look at the people who served God in the Bible, this could be said about all of them except for Jesus.

There are, therefore, a couple things that need to be addressed for the good of the order. First, as Chrsitians, we are ALL set apart for faithful service to God. Not all of us are called to serve as pastors, but all of us are called to SERVE. Second, the only One who has it all together is God/Jesus Christ. All other people are sinful and in need of God’s grace. To put anyone but God on the pedastal is to make an idol of him/her. Of course, idols ALWAYS fail to deliver the goods, as it were, and that eventually sets the pedastal person up to fail…and FALL…HARD.

As Christians, let us remember that we are to look to God, and to God alone for our salvation. Only God has everything altogether. Only God is faithful without fault. We should respect the offices of those who are serving God; however, we should not view such people, pastors or otherwise, as “holier than thou”. To do so is to turn our back on the One who can actually save us…the one who called your pastor and all pastors, the one who called you and all Christians, to join in the building of God’s heavenly kingdom. Let us turn our eyes upon Jesus and follow him from where we are to where he’s called us to be.

THOUGHT OF THE DAY
“Turn your eyes upon Jesus, look full in his wonderful face, and the things of earth will grow strangely dim in the light of his glory and grace.” – Helen H. Lemmel

PRAYER
Lord, steer me away from idolatry, false hope, and unrealistic expectations. Guide my eyes to look upon you Lord. Amen.

Them

Read Deuteronomy 10:14-22

ALSO IN SCRIPTURE
“The LORD protects the foreigners among us. He cares for the orphans and widows, but he frustrates the plans of the wicked” (Psalm 146:9, NLT).

There’s a series on Prime Video that was recently released, entitled, “Them”. It was conceived of and produced by Little Marvin who, up until this series, was a little known actor and producer. From the get go, I could tell that this series was going to be edgy to say the least and that it was likely to keep anyone watching it at the edge of their seat, if not scared out it. Yet, the edgy horror that I was expecting watch was not what I discovered in this film; in fact, this film’s horror was far more dark and REAL.

The film follows the Emorys, who are a black family living in Jim Crow North Carolina. The show opens up with a scene that immediately sets you on edge and it soon becomes clear that being black in North Carolina was not ideal. The very first scene shows the horror of Jim Crow and the way blacks were treated less than human, even though Federal law technically said they were free citizens of the United States.

Without giving away what happens at the beginning of the show, suffice it to say that the experience is the last straw that causes the Emorys to uproot and leave North Carolina behind in search for a place to live where they will be treated like the free citizens they are. This show, of course, takes place in 1953 in the midst of what has since become known as the Great Migration, where countless black families uprooted and left the Jim Crow South for the American Promised Land, places that actively promoted themselves as places of opportunity and the American Dream.

Sadly, black families soon realized that the land of opportunity was not TRULY for them. Places like the Bronx, the South Side of Chicago, Detroit, Minneapolis, and West Compton were lily white suburbs that were as hostile as the Jim Crow South, but in more pernicious and hidden ways. Areas that blacks moved into were zoned off to be “red zones”, meaning that they were beyond help and that the local and state governments would not send funding in for infrastructure or anything else. Property sales dropped in neighborhoods where black families moved in, furthering the already racially charged resentment against these new, and most unwelcome neighbors.

In the neighborhoods themselves, white people did everythign they could to rid themselves of black neighbors. Some white folks uprooted and left right away. Others took measures to ensure that their neighborhood would not be overrun by blacks. Sitting outside their homes, staring in their windows, placing signs and whatnot on their lawns, all in an attempt to intimidate the black families and scare them out of the neighborhood. When those attempts failed, and eventually they did, white folks left those neighborhoods en masse and the money followed them. Businesses and jobs dried up as a result of white people fleeing away from their black neighbors. This flight of white people became known as white flight and, when we look at patterns of moving today, it still exists.

All of this racism not only had a negative effect on beautiful, loving, and hopeful black families looking to leave Jim Crow behind, but it also destroyed what were once beautiful neighborhoods that offered hope and promise to all who lived within them. Let’s be clear, it was not the black families who destroyed those neighborhoods, it was white families and systemic racism that brought about their demise. Sadly, as has been all too often the case, racism destroyed perfectly good neighborhoods and left black people to fend for themselves in a system that saw them less than human.

The challenge for us is to recognize that the “us” vs. “them mentality is, at its core, sinful. It results in the evils of racism, xenophobia, homophobia, transphobia, and plenty of other evils. Christ has not called us to view people as “other” than us. There is no “them” in God, there is just US. Regardless of what one’s views, we are never called by God to dehumanize others or see them as less than us. We are always called to LOVE and treat people equally as created in imago Dei (aka the image of God. Let us shed our biases and fears off of us and live as Christ calls us to live.

THOUGHT OF THE DAY
“Racism comes in many different forms. Sometimes it’s subtle, and sometimes it’s overt. Sometimes it’s violent, and sometimes it’s harmless, but it’s definitely here. It’s something that I think we’re all guilty of, and we just have to make sure that we deal with our own personal racism in the right way.” – Jordan Peele

PRAYER
Lord, forgive me for my biases and help me to overcome viewing other people as “other” or less than I am. Help me to view all people as equally made in your image. Amen.

Episode 201 | I See You, part 3: R.E.S.P.E.C.T for the Stranger

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-fc7zt-102e9d2

In this episode, Rev. Todd discusses the importance of listening, acting and advocating on behalf of the marginalized.

EPISODE NOTES:

First UMC of Newton, NJ premieres worship online on Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Join us for worship on YouTube.

If you worship with us online and/or you would like to give to First UMC of Newton, your generosity will help us sustain with our mission and ministries during this COVID-19 pandemic. We are still paying our staff and we are still ministering to people in our community and beyond. Your support is vital to us being able to do so. Thank you for considering giving at https://tithe.ly/give?c=1377216 or https://paypal.me/newtonumc.

Sign up for bi-weekly devotions at Life-Giving Water.

Subscribe to Life-Giving Water Messages, also on iTunes and Google Play Music.

Subscribe to the Party on Johncast, co-hosted by Rev. Sal Seirmarco and Rev. Todd Lattig